About your Search

20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
, democrats running for re-election and most of them come from midwestern, western states. they have strong, rural communities and therefore are a lot more open to maintaining gun rights and so you will have a lot of these democrats who will be very nervous voting for any big changes and harry reid is one of them. the national rifle association stayed out of the reelection race and he owes it to them to perhaps temper the debate and not necessarily let all of this go through. >> that's one reason why you're seeing the president take executive action and that's something you heard critics and people who had been his supporters criticized him for not doing more of that in his first term and he's signaling that he's willing to do more of that on these big fights and it's about seizing the moment because the further and further you get from the sandy hook tragedy, the less you're likely to achieve and he's trying to make this happen swiftly. >> let's talk about second terms. how have presidents comparatively, how have they feared in his second term. that's when the big scandal happens. the iran
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
that got him e re-elected and the way he paid tribute today. >> he came up late in the civil rights movement and always said that he regretted that. this is what he finally proclaimed with such passion today. you can look at his life and doctor king and the rise of civil rights in a very personal way. the day barack obama was born, four civil rights workers were arrested in louisiana. on august 4th, the civil rights act was passed by the senate. so there's so much history that was sort of, you could see it in his face today, i think in a more profound way than even is first inaugural. >> well, he comes from an unusual background. he comes from an imgrant mother who left the scene, white mother, middle american mother raised in hawaii and raised again in indonesia. >> so he had to construct an identity where he discovered, constructed, i think, because it was a deliberate process. he wrote about it in dreams for my father, his first book, it's been written about by others. and the identity that he constructed is an african american man. he went into the community in chicago, he -- yo
as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. elp protecth as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation thro
campaigned on this, and is he elected and has a mandate for this. we didn't hear about climate change or guns. these are things that happened. he does seem to feel empowered. empowered. at the same time he is burned by the collapse of the grand bargain, and he doesn't have the confidence that he can find counter parties on the other side. >> yeah. you know, his governing and electoral coalition for the last four years has been unlikely thing. it's been big and full of folks that the democrats typically have not been able to put on the table together. it was never in his interest to fully reveal himself and getting re-elected because it might not have helped him. i think yesterday he did kind of say exactly finally in a way who he is and where he wants to go, and he really hasn't before. you know, i was probably the only person thinking about george w. bush's second inaugural address when he said i want to liberate all people all over the world, and even conservatives thought are you nuts, are you crazy? you can't do that. yesterday obama talked about really liberties at home, both in terms of
, over the top paranoia started with the election of a black president. >> how so? connect. >> let's remember that in 2008 obama had campaigned for his first election being afraid to mention the words gun and law in the same paragraph. he never said a single thing about gun control, gun safety laws. yet when he was elected, gun stores sold out of guns. gun stores sold out of ammunition because the gun lobby had persuaded them that this guy is coming for your guns. they're already paranoid, extremist -- >> let's get to that overlay. >> they don't like progressive, democratic administrations. a black president makes them crazy. >> this is what's changed congresswoman, in my focus. you have been totally focused for a generation since the tragedy in your family. this idea that we don't have a gun to protect ourselves, we don't have to go skeet shooting or shoot rabbits or deer in deer season, it's not the usual sort of healthy sounding at least reasons to have a gun. it's now i need my gun to protect me against the helicopters, the federal government, or the u.n. is coming to get me. a
think we've been saying it some time now. with the latest results of the national elections we've been saying it a little more strenuously and a little more strongly. but i will say that the bulk of the republican party seems not to be listening. as you just pointed out. they call it a communications problem or they call it a -- we're just not getting the really hard core message of the republican party across. i'm afraid they are getting that message across. and that message is tinged with intolerance for women, for minorities, for the lgbt community and for others who don't, you know, measure up to the mitt romney image, for example, of the other percent, the 47% that doesn't count is what the republicans simply don't appeal to. >> colonel, are they on their way to being a regional party? >> i think they're on their way to committing suicide, very frankly. this has happened before in our history where an existing party has either morphed into another or died and this might just be happening again. if they don't adjust the way they're looking at the rest of this country, if they don't
having been re-elected, having been reaffirmed by the american people in the role as the first family in an odd way we were voting on them as first family. and the american people said, you know what? we may disagree with him on policy and we don't trust him on social security, whatever, but we kind of like that family. we kind of trust that family, and that's -- >> how did they do it? >> by working very hard at being normal. >> right. >> as joy said, stylish, but normal. and i think to see them so comfortable now is a reflection not only of them but of the country. whatever else you want to say, whatever other arguments we're going to have about entitlements, about war, about medicare, about medicaid, it's not going to be about having an african-american first family because they have done it so beautifully. and by the way, to have walked the tightrope of race the way they have, having come up as baby boomers in the affirmative action era when people thought, hey, wait a minute, maybe they don't deserve it, they've got to prove themselves, barack and michelle have proved themselves i
affair particularly or the love fest from republican elected officials. >> i want to talk a little bit more about the hearing yesterday. i also thought what she comported herself incredibly well and for the most part was composed. i can't imagine having to do that for five and a half hours. it was actually pretty impressive. one of the moments that we showed earlier that fiery exchange of senator johnson and that moment where she asks, when's the difference at this point? you know, really, went over well with the supporters and many others found it pretty offensive and potentially damaging. obviously, the difference is the whole point about this and informs the foreign policy and the difference maybe why a filmmaker is currently in jail and we agreed that the moment was sort of like a rorschach test. if you like her, that's a great victory. maybe if you don't you saw that as pretty damaging. what are you hearing on the hill from democrats and republicans about that particular moment and any sort of long lasting affects it might have? >> well, clearly, that was the one moment the republ
to come out who are still elected representatives of the party. one, to say hey, let's have a real conversation here and not just hide behind the nra and its rhetoric of fear. >> michael, do you think there are any republicans that will vote for any of the proposals that were put on the table today. >> i do. and i'll tell you why. it's the numb befrs that you show in the first segment today, those poll numbers. that's where the rubber meets the road here. it's a turning point and one that the party better get in front of. >> at this point in time, the only voice the gop is really hearing are the crazy ones. so you might be right, michael, susan, any other republicans who are out there. but as the debate is being framed, we don't see any real republicans in leadership positions taking a moderate -- >> michael, i hope you're correct. >> the obama campaign apparatus is going to take on the nra. we'll ask if the president will hit the road to make his case directly to the american people. then find out how survivors are reacting to the president's plan. sandyhook's top educator gives a
% of the members. they're sick and tired of getting elected to go up to washington, do their job, sit on committees, work through bills that come through their committees, and then take those bills to the house floor, the senate floor, vote on them, then go to conference. i joked before, it was a lot like, you know, i'm just a bill. "schoolhouse rock." that doesn't happen anymore. americans don't realize that you always end up with a couple of people behind closed doors in the back -- we were on the hill yesterday. i heard this complaint from republicans, from democrats, from senators, from congressmen and congresswomen. they all say the same thing. we don't get to do our jobs. they come up here and in the end it's always the president and john boehner in a back room, and we just sit around. >> so much of the disillusionment you hear from members who feel they're going to make a difference is exactly what you're talking about. and so much of the infighting is really not so much between the parties, while there's plenty of that, there is such a frustration between house and senate. they openly knock
her outburst is not an outburst. it's a re-election flection of l think about this. if you were going to be real about these issues you would be asking what can we do to beef up the security. something gop members have already cut, you know, and they have decisions to cut it now in these days as we're speaking. it's rank hypocrisy. i think it's a fresh breath of air that people -- >> i agree with you about the hypocrisy because i remember 9/11 very clearly and i remember how this country rallied around a president who had limited ability but we all rallied around him. the first reaction was he says we're going to get the people who knocked down this building and everybody cheered him. they weren't saying how did you screw it up buddy. it was about unit. the left and center are much better at national unity than the right. the right sees a national tragedy like this far off in bengha benghazi, not in new york city, at a very exposed position which could have happened no matter how many troops he would there. we don't blame it on everybody even know it was new york right into the heart
interesting thing to compare him to would be right after the 2010 elections when they brought in daly which signaled that they wanted to change their approach inside the white house, wanted to reach out to business, wanted to try to reach out to republicans, have better relationships with the house and senate. what this pick signals is that it's going to be a more combative white house, continue to be a pretty insular white house. i think some of the bellyaching speci internally, it's another white guy in leadership role inside the white house. it signals to me an approach where they're ready for combat. we see that in the legislation they're talking about for the next year that he wants to be pushing. and that also just the reality that the next two years are not going to be a pleasant two years for relationships between the white house and congress. nobody's expecting a grand bargain anymore. i think the chance -- they had a good chance to have one a couple months ago. they have almost no chance to get one now. the reality is it's going to be grind it out for the next couple years. he has
for the republican party, everybody's been saying after the election, maybe they can get it together, circle the wagons, come up with a new position, new policies. >> this gives them more time to work on this. i don't have any ideas for them on that, i got to tell you. good luck. >> luke, how much -- i mean, we played that sound from rush limbaugh, rush limbaugh is the mayor of planet crazy, but at the same time, he does speak for -- you know this, house caucus, there are people, yesterday mo brooks plans to oppose this, he has a serious problem on his hands. to what degree are they going to be placated or feel they need to put party or country before primary? >> that doesn't apply to these folks. we say to the term "chuckle heads" sort of in a joking manner, but that's what they are referred to now. this apocalyptic group, which will not move forward on anything, and because the margins are smaller now, you see that in the house of representatives. what i find fascinating is the democrats' ability to hold their members and say, look, let's try and splinter the house gop. let's try and make
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15